Getting Support for Yourself

If you are feeling suicidal it is important that you take immediate steps to keep yourself safe.

  • Postpone any decision to end your life. While it may feel like you have to act now on your thoughts of suicide, try to postpone that decision as far as possible. Many people report that by postponing a decision to die, they found that their life did change. They were able to get the support they needed and could move on to a better, happier place.
  • Tell someone how you feel and, if possible, have them stay with you until you get help.
  • Contact a health professional and tell them you are feeling suicidal and need urgent assistance.
  • Call one of the numbers on this page.

SANE Forums

SANE Forums are a peer-to-peer support service helping those affected by complex mental health to feel safe and supported by an online community. SANE Forums are available 24/7 and moderated by mental health professionals. Visit SANE Forums

Helplines

If you are experiencing an emergency or crisis please dial 000 on your phone

The above numbers are all accessible 24/7.

Some Tips for Getting Urgent Help Include

  • Express the urgency of the matter without becoming aggressive
  • Speak clearly
  • Give the health professional specific examples of concerns
  • Give a brief history of self harm or harm to others
  • Ensure that you listen to their advice
  • If they are unable to help, ask them why and who you should contact. Don’t give up.

Supporting Someone You Know

If you are concerned that someone you know is considering suicide, act promptly. Always take suicide seriously. Don’t assume that the person will get better without help or that they will seek help on their own.

  • See the Need Help Now section (right) for the contact details of people who can provide immediate assistance and contact them.
  • Take practical steps to keep both the person at risk and yourself safe. This may include ensuring the immediate safety of yourself and the person you are looking out for and seeking long longer term support.

It’s important to remember that even though you can offer support, you are not responsible for the actions or behaviour of your friend. If they are not willing to help themselves, it is not your fault.

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